Work Friendships
 

One of the great debates in human resources is determining the fine line with Work friendships between managers and employees. When you spend 40 hours a week or more with someone, of course you would want to have a few work friendships with those people. Our co-workers are ” not only our break buddies and lunch dates, they’re our allies, our colleagues, and collaborators,” says INC writer Candice Galek.

Without these relationships, work places would probably feel constantly like this.

However, distinguishing what is over the line and what isn’t when it comes to employee/manager friendships isn’t always so easy. Multiple studies have been done trying to figure out what the majority of people think how close is to close. One study found that 6 out 10 managers reported feeling uncomfortable when their employees or bosses friended them on Facebook. The use of social media blurs this line because of the human resources issues that can arise on social media, such as inappropriate comments or pictures from an employee.

On the other hand, a good number of studies have found that work friendships can have a great positive impact on a workplace. Forbes contributor Kristi Hedges writes, “Gallup’s State of the American Workplace poll has famously shown that friendships increase employee satisfaction by 50% and that people with a best friend at work are seven times more likely to be engaged.”

Another study Hedges discusses found that, “more than 60% of employees who have between six and 25 friends at work admit to loving their companies” Both of these studies point to a strong positive correlation between happiness at work and friendships.

But, what if you get promoted and climb the corporate ladder? You don’t want to give up your friendships. Newly promoted managers can maintain those friendships, but still be seen as a leader. INC writer Candice Galek suggests that the following that best bosses do to maintain friendships with their employees:

  1. Be in the know of what your office in fanatical about.
  2. Take an interest in your colleagues.
  3. Don’t skip out on work events.
  4. Ask co-workers to go to lunch.

Whether you’re new to the company as a manager or newly promoted, friendly relationships promotes employee happiness and engagement, creating a positive company culture. Determine your boundaries between work and friendships and respect others’ boundaries. If you’re struggling with friends at work, this article has some content that might be beneficial to you.

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